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Great Habits, Great Readers: A Practical Guide for K - 4 Reading in the Light of...

Great Habits, Great Readers: A Practical Guide for K - 4 Reading in the Light of Common Core

Great Habits, Great Readers: A Practical Guide for K - 4 Reading in the Light of Common Core

  • Great Habits, Great Readers: A Practical Guide for K - 4 Reading in the Light of Common CoreGreat Habits, Great Readers: A Practical Guide for K - 4 Reading in the Light of Common Core


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A book that brings the habits of reading to life Great readers are not made by genetics or destiny but by the habits they build—habits that are intentionally built by their teachers. The early formal years of education are the key to reversing the reading gap and setting up children for success. But K-4 education seems to widen the gap between stronger and weaker readers, not close it. Today, the Common Core further increases the pressure to reach high levels of rigor. What can be done? This book includes the strategies, systems, and lessons from the top classrooms that bring the habits of reading to life, creating countless quality opportunities for students to take one of the most complex skills we as people can know and to perform it fluently and easily. Offers clear teaching strategies for teaching reading to all students, no matter what level Includes more than 40 video examples from real classrooms Written by Paul Bambrick-Santoyo, bestselling author of Driven by Data and Leverage Leadership Great Habits, Great Readers puts the focus on: learning habits, reading habits, guided reading, and independent reading. NOTE: Content DVD and other supplementary materials are not included as part of the e-book file, but are available for download after purchase

Authors: Paul Bambrick-Santoyo, Aja Settles, Juliana Worrell
Creator: Norman Atkins
Languages: English Published, English Original Language, English Unknown
ASIN: 1118143957
Paperback
Book
Publication Date: 2013-06-10
Studio: Jossey-Bass
Label: Jossey-Bass
Publisher: Jossey-Bass
Manufacturer: Jossey-Bass
Edition: 1
Number Of Items: 1
MPN: 26530636
ISBN: 1118143957
EAN: 9781118143957
Package Quantity: 1
Title: Great Habits, Great Readers: A Practical Guide for K - 4 Reading in the Light of Common Core

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Product Description
A book that brings the habits of reading to life Great readers are not made by genetics or destiny but by the habits they build—habits that are intentionally built by their teachers. The early formal years of education are the key to reversing the reading gap and setting up children for success. But K-4 education seems to widen the gap between stronger and weaker readers, not close it. Today, the Common Core further increases the pressure to reach high levels of rigor. What can be done? This book includes the strategies, systems, and lessons from the top classrooms that bring the habits of reading to life, creating countless quality opportunities for students to take one of the most complex skills we as people can know and to perform it fluently and easily. Offers clear teaching strategies for teaching reading to all students, no matter what level Includes more than 40 video examples from real classrooms Written by Paul Bambrick-Santoyo, bestselling author of Driven by Data and Leverage Leadership Great Habits, Great Readers puts the focus on: learning habits, reading habits, guided reading, and independent reading. NOTE: Content DVD and other supplementary materials are not included as part of the e-book file, but are available for download after purchase

Amazon.com Review
Top 4 Tips for K-4 Reading Teachers 1. Habits begin at the moment of error, not the moment of success. Address student error when it happens, and you create opportunities for students to practice the right habits instead of the wrong ones. 2. Change how students talk about reading and you’ll change how they think about reading. Authentic literary discussions give students unequalled opportunities to do the heavy cognitive work of reading—and they’re possible even for our youngest students. 3. Students can’t fall in love with reading if they aren’t reading to begin with. Consequently, independent reading—a sustained block of time that all students spend reading on their own—is integral to the success of any reading program. 4. The Common Core asks us to accelerate our instruction. Our students need us to meet them where they are. With the right tools in hand, you can do both. Exemplary guided reading instruction will allow you to teach a continuum of skills while tailoring your instruction in those skills to the developmental needs of each child. Q&A With the Authors Let’s start with the big question: How will Great Habits, Great Readers help teachers prepare students for Common Core-level rigor? That word “rigor” is really the key. As educators, we all want our students to be able to thrive in a rigorous learning environment where they-- not we--do the heavy cognitive work. And the Common Core standards only take us halfway to that goal. They’re a big step towards rigor, because they require students to master more complex skills by younger grades than ever before. But whether we actually reach rigor still depends on how we measure those standards. For example, the Common Core says third graders need to know how to identify character traits. But the third-grade teacher who asks “Did the brother really mean it when he said he was okay?” isn’t giving her students such rigorous instruction as the teacher who asks “What is the brother feeling?” It’s the second question that forces the student to do the thinking. So, in this book we’re bridging the gap between what the Common Core says on paper and how it looks in the classroom. We’re saying, here’s how to build classrooms that do what that second question does. You mention in the book that while the Common Core requires a greater focus on informational texts, it doesn’t say we should stop teaching narrative texts. Can you tell us more about that? One of the most dangerous myths about the Common Core is that it asks teachers to devote half of their literacy block time to informational texts. While the Common Core does support the NAEP distribution of literary versus informational texts--which asks that fourth-grade students split their time 50-50 between both--it also points out that this doesn’t mean we need to take literature away from our classrooms. A much better solution: support literacy in other content-area classes by using informational texts to teach science and social studies. You’ll fulfill—probably exceed--the NAEP’s 50% informational requirement, drive student learning in content-area classes, and still have plenty of space to teach students the narrative reading skills they need. Literacy-driven content-area instruction is a vast topic--one that merits another book on its own! But, in brief, it would require students to read a text in order to understand specific concepts. Reading would also be the key to building new vocabulary: students would learn new words by reading increasingly complex texts, not by being assigned stand-alone vocabulary lists. It may sound like a tough order for elementary students, but in our own work in the classroom, we’ve been amazed by their ability to use their existing knowledge base to tackle more and more complex reading in every subject. The book puts a lot of effort into showing teachers how to implement the Reading-by-Habit model--you’ve included videos, sample lesson plans, a chapter on scheduling with variations for the resources different teachers might have available, and so on. Do you believe that any teacher can use the model detailed in the book? Absolutely! What’s most magical about great reading instruction is that, in fact, it’s not magical at all: it’s based on concrete actions that are replicable by any teacher, at any school. This is epitomized by the Guided Reading Prompting Guides we include in the book. When you see a master teacher prompt during a reading lesson, that teacher often looks like a mind reader--or, at the very least, like someone with years of teaching experience. But when you take a closer look at exactly what our most successful teachers say when they prompt, we come up with a comprehensive guide that any teacher can use to anticipate where students will struggle and plan how to help them back on track. We believe all students have what it takes to learn to read, and we believe all teachers have the power to get them there, too. It’s all a matter not of inborn talent, but of learning the right things to do.


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